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We Focus on Access, So You Can Focus on Protecting Your Patients’ Vision

We are dedicated to helping every patient get the medicine they need

Several options are available that may help patients with the out-of-pocket (OOP) costs of VABYSMO. Find the right assistance option for your patient using the Patient Assistance Tool.

We Focus on Access, So You Can Focus on Protecting Your Patients’ Vision

We're dedicated to helping every patient get the medicine they need

Several options are available that may help patients with the out-of-pocket (OOP) costs of VABYSMO. Find the right assistance option for your patient using the Patient Assistance Tool.

  • Is your patient insured?

  • Does the patient's insurance cover his or her Genentech treatment?

  • Does your patient have commercial insurance?

  • Has your patient already been referred to the Genentech Ophthalmology Co-pay Program and is either ineligible or no longer receiving assistance?

  • Has your patient already been referred to an independent co-pay assistance foundation and is either ineligible or no longer receiving assistance?

  • Is the patient taking VABYSMO for an FDA-approved indication?

Your Patient Might Qualify for a Referral to the Genentech Ophthalmology Co-pay Program

If eligible commercially insured patients need assistance with their drug and/or administration out-of-pocket costs, the Genentech Ophthalmology Co-pay Program may help.*

 

Learn More

 

*Eligibility criteria apply. Not valid for patients using federal or state government programs to pay for their medications and/or administration of their Genentech medication. Patient must be taking the Genentech medication for an FDA-approved indication. See full Terms and Conditions at EyeOnCopay.com.

Your Patient Might Qualify for a Referral to an Independent Co-pay Assistance Foundation

For eligible patients with commercial or public health insurance, VABYSMO Access Solutions offers referrals to independent co-pay assistance foundations.*

 

Learn More

 

*Independent co-pay assistance foundations have their own rules for eligibility. Genentech has no involvement or influence in independent foundation decision-making or eligibility criteria and does not know if a foundation will be able to help your patient. We can only refer your patient to a foundation that supports their disease state. Genentech does not endorse or show preference for any particular foundation. The foundations to which we refer your patient may not be the only ones that might be able to help.

Your Patient Might Qualify for a Referral to the Genentech Patient Foundation

The Genentech Patient Foundation provides free Genentech treatment to people who don't have insurance coverage or who have financial concerns and meet eligibility criteria.*

Learn More

 

*To be eligible for free Genentech treatment from the Genentech Patient Foundation, insured patients who have coverage for their treatment should try to pursue other forms of financial assistance, if available, and meet certain income requirements. Uninsured patients and insured patients without coverage for their treatment must meet a different set of income requirements. Genentech reserves the right to modify or discontinue the program at any time and to verify the accuracy of information submitted.

Over 90% of people nationally have insurance coverage for VABYSMO*


Eligible commercially insured patients pay as little as $0 per drug (up to $15,000 per calendar year) and $0 per administration (up to $1,000 per calendar year) with the Genentech Ophthalmology Co-Pay Program


Commercial and publicly insured patients can be referred to independent co-pay assistance foundations


Eligible patients with or without insurance coverage may receive help from the Genentech Patient Foundation§

*Coverage defined as all Medicare Fee for Service and Medicare Advantage lives and policy tracking for top ~60 payers including Humana, United, Anthem, CVS/Aetna, Cigna. Assumes a similar coverage picture among small payers that are not currently tracked. Specific coverage may vary for individuals and plans. Data as of July 2022.

Effective December 1 2022. The Product and Administration Co-pay Programs are valid ONLY for patients with commercial (private or non-governmental) insurance who have a valid prescription for a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved indication of a Genentech medicine. Patients using Medicare, Medicaid or any other federal or state government program (collectively, “Government Programs”) to pay for their Genentech medicine and/or administration services are not eligible. Under the Programs, the patient may pay a co-pay for drug costs and a co-pay for administration costs. The final amount owed by a patient may be as little as $0 for the Genentech medicine or administration of the Genentech medicine (see Program specific details). The total patient out-of-pocket cost is dependent on the patient’s health insurance plan. The Programs assist with the cost of the Genentech medicine and the Genentech medicine administration only. It does not assist with the cost of other administrations, medicines, procedures or office visit fees. After reaching the maximum Programs’ benefit amounts, the patient will be responsible for all remaining out-of-pocket expenses. The amount of the Programs’ benefits cannot exceed the patient’s out-of-pocket expenses for the cost of the Genentech medicine or administration fees associated with the Genentech medicine. All participants are responsible for reporting the receipt of all Programs’ benefits as required by any insurer or by law. The Programs are only valid in the United States and U.S. Territories and are void where prohibited by law. The Drug Co-pay Program shall follow state restrictions in relation to AB-rated generic equivalents (e.g., MA, CA) where applicable. The Administration Co-pay Program is not valid for Massachusetts or Rhode Island residents. No party may seek reimbursement for all or any part of the benefit received through the Programs. The Programs are intended for the patient. Only the patient using the Programs may receive the funds made available through the Programs. The Programs are not intended for third parties who reduce the amount available to the patient or take a portion for their own purposes. Patients with health plans that redirect Genentech Program assistance intended for patient out-of-pocket costs may be subject to alternate Program benefit structures. Genentech reserves the right to rescind, revoke or amend the Programs without notice at any time. Additional terms and conditions apply. Please visit EyeOnCopay.com for the full list of Terms and Conditions.

Independent co-pay assistance foundations have their own rules for eligibility. Genentech has no involvement or influence in independent foundation decision-making or eligibility criteria and does not know if a foundation will be able to help your patient. We can only refer your patient to a foundation that supports their disease state. Genentech does not endorse or show preference for any particular foundation. The foundations to which we refer your patient may not be the only ones that might be able to help.

§To be eligible for free Genentech Ophthalmology treatment from the Genentech Patient Foundation, insured patients who have coverage for their treatment should try to pursue other forms of financial assistance, if available, and meet certain income requirements. Uninsured patients and insured patients without coverage for their treatment must meet a different set of income requirements. Genentech reserves the right to modify or discontinue the program at any time and to verify the accuracy of information submitted.

Important Safety Information & Indications

INDICATIONS

VABYSMO (faricimab-svoa) is a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor and angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) inhibitor indicated for the treatment of patients with Neovascular (Wet) Age-Related Macular Degeneration (nAMD) and Diabetic Macular Edema (DME). 

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
Contraindications

VABYSMO is contraindicated in patients with ocular or periocular infection, in patients with active intraocular inflammation, and in patients with known hypersensitivity to faricimab or any of the excipients in VABYSMO. Hypersensitivity reactions may manifest as rash, pruritus, urticaria, erythema, or severe intraocular inflammation.

Warnings and Precautions
Endophthalmitis and Retinal Detachments

Intravitreal injections have been associated with endophthalmitis and retinal detachments. Proper aseptic injection techniques must always be used when administering VABYSMO. Patients should be instructed to report any symptoms suggestive of endophthalmitis or retinal detachment without delay, to permit prompt and appropriate management.

Increase in Intraocular Pressure

Transient increases in intraocular pressure (IOP) have been seen within 60 minutes of intravitreal injection, including with VABYSMO. IOP and the perfusion of the optic nerve head should be monitored and managed appropriately.

Thromboembolic Events

Although there was a low rate of arterial thromboembolic events (ATEs) observed in the VABYSMO clinical trials, there is a potential risk of ATEs following intravitreal use of VEGF inhibitors. ATEs are defined as nonfatal stroke, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or vascular death (including deaths of unknown cause). 

The incidence of reported ATEs in the nAMD studies during the first year was 1% (7 out of 664) in patients treated with VABYSMO compared with 1% (6 out of 662) in patients treated with aflibercept.

The incidence of reported ATEs in the DME studies during the first year was 2% (25 out of 1,262) in patients treated with VABYSMO compared with 2% (14 out of 625) in patients treated with aflibercept.

Adverse Reactions

The most common adverse reaction (≥5%) reported in patients receiving VABYSMO was conjunctival hemorrhage (7%).

Pregnancy, Lactation, Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Based on the mechanism of action of VEGF and Ang-2 inhibitors, there is a potential risk to female reproductive capacity, and to embryo-fetal development. VABYSMO should not be used during pregnancy unless the potential benefit to the patient outweighs the potential risk to the fetus. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for VABYSMO and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from VABYSMO. Females of reproductive potential are advised to use effective contraception prior to the initial dose, during treatment and for at least 3 months following the last dose of VABYSMO. 

You may report side effects to the FDA at (800) FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Genentech at (888) 835-2555.

Please see additional Important Safety Information in the full VABYSMO Prescribing Information.

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